A.I. Finds a New Way to Build Multiple-Star Systems

Over over 50% of high mass stars reside in multiple star systems. But due to their complex orbital interactions, physicists have a difficult time understanding just how stable and long-lived these systems are. Recently a team of astronomers applied machine learning techniques to simulations of multiple star systems and found a new way that stars …

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Astronomers use Earthquakes to Understand Glitches on Neutron Stars

A team of astronomers have used a model of earthquakes to understand glitches in the timing of pulsars. Their results suggest that pulsars may have interiors that are far stranger than can be imagined. Pulsars are perhaps the most accurate timekeepers in the entire universe. The pulsars themselves are really rapidly spinning neutron stars. Neutron …

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Spanish-owned communications satellite ready for weekend launch

Artist’s concept of the Amazonas Nexus satellite in orbit, with its antennas and solar arrays unfurled. Credit: Thales Alenia Space A nearly five-ton satellite for the Spanish company Hispasat is ready for liftoff from Cape Canaveral Sunday, weather permitting, aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, beginning a mission to provide in-flight internet and other communications …

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Curiosity Finds Another Metal Meteorite on Mars

MSL Curiosity is going about its business exploring Mars. The high-tech rover is currently exploring the sulphate-bearing unit on Mt. Sharp, the central peak in Mars’ Gale Crater. Serendipity placed a metal meteorite in its path. The meteorite is made mostly of nickel and iron, and it has a name: Cacao. (Chocolate comes from cacao.) …

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Hungry Black Hole was Already Feasting 800 Million Years After the Big Bang

Black holes swallow everything—including light—which explains why we can’t see them. But we can observe their immediate surroundings and learn about them. And when they’re on a feeding binge, their surroundings become even more luminous and observable. This increased luminosity allowed astronomers to find a black hole that was feasting on material only 800 million …

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The Ultimate Guide To Identifying Different Types Of Palletization

Palletization is a core step in the supply chain process. On the surface, palletizing can seem very simple — you just stack boxes onto an empty pallets. But there are many different types of palletization and various ways to compare these types. With so many different pallet types and materials, process layouts, and levels of …

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Mars Ingenuity Kicks up a Surprising Amount of Dust Every Time it Lands

There’s no way to sugarcoat it: Mars has a “dust problem.” The surface of the Red Planet is covered in particulate matter consisting of tiny bits of silica and oxidized minerals. During a Martian summer in the southern hemisphere, the planet experiences dust storms that can grow to encompass the entire planet. At other times …

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This Binary System is Destined to Become a Kilonova

Kilonovae are extraordinarily rare. Astronomers think there are only about 10 of them in the Milky Way. But they’re extraordinarily powerful and produce heavy elements like uranium, thorium, and gold. Usually, astronomers spot them after they’ve merged and emitted powerful gamma-ray bursts (GRBs.) But astronomers using the SMARTS telescope say they’ve spotted a kilonova progenitor …

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How Can We Know if We’re Looking at Habitable exo-Earths or Hellish exo-Venuses?

The differences between Earth and Venus are obvious to us. One is radiant with life and adorned with glittering seas, and the other is a scorching, glowering hellhole, its volcanic surface shrouded by thick clouds and visible only with radar. But the difference wasn’t always clear. In fact, we used to call Venus Earth’s sister …

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